Newspaper delivery man and his family bring groceries to seniors amid coronavirus

At a time when countless Americans are relying on local heroes to stay safe, Greg Dailey and his family are stepping up.

Dailey is a small business owner and newspaper delivery man in Mercer County, New Jersey. Virtually every day for the past 25 years, he’s woken up at 4 a.m. to deliver newspapers to 800 homes in his community. But since the novel coronavirusshutdowns began, Dailey has been delivering more than newspapers — he’s delivering groceries, too.

“These are unprecedented times and people still have to eat,” said Dailey. “We’re a big family that believes in helping each other.”

The idea struck Dailey two weeks ago. Phyllis Ross, an 88-year-old costumer on his paper route, asked if he could drop her newspaper closer to her garage to limit the amount of time she was outside. Then it hit him.

“I went to the store and I thought to myself, ‘How in the world is she going to get groceries,'” said Dailey.

He called up Ross and asked if she needed any supplies from the store, which she took as a godsend.

“We were absolutely floored when he called,” said Ross. “At my age, I’m afraid to go into a store.”

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A Million N95 Masks Are Coming From China—on Board the New England Patriots’ Plane

The Massachusetts governor struck a deal for supplies but needed a way to transport them. The result was a tense saga and a shipment on the NFL team’s 767.

At 3:38 a.m. Wednesday morning, the New England Patriots’ team plane departed from an unusual locale: Shenzhen, China. On board the Boeing 767, in the cargo hold that used to be home to Tom Brady’s duffel bags, were 1.2 million N95 masks bound for the U.S.

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Covid-19 Changed How the World Does Science, Together

Never before, scientists say, have so many of the world’s researchers focused so urgently on a single topic. Nearly all other research has ground to a halt.

Using flag-draped memes and military terminology, the Trump administration and its Chinese counterparts have cast coronavirus research as national imperatives, sparking talk of a biotech arms race.

The world’s scientists, for the most part, have responded with a collective eye roll.

“Absolutely ridiculous,” said Jonathan Heeney, a Cambridge University researcher working on a coronavirus vaccine.

“That isn’t how things happen,” said Adrian Hill, the head of the Jenner Institute at Oxford, one of the largest vaccine research centers at an academic institution.

While political leaders have locked their borders, scientists have been shattering theirs, creating a global collaboration unlike any in history. Never before, researchers say, have so many experts in so many countries focused simultaneously on a single topic and with such urgency. Nearly all other research has ground to a halt.

Normal imperatives like academic credit have been set aside. Online repositories make studies available months ahead of journals. Researchers have identified and shared hundreds of viral genome sequences. More than 200 clinical trials have been launched, bringing together hospitals and laboratories around the globe.

“I never hear scientists — true scientists, good quality scientists — speak in terms of nationality,” said Dr. Francesco Perrone, who is leading a coronavirus clinical trial in Italy. “My nation, your nation. My language, your language. My geographic location, your geographic location. This is something that is really distant from true top-level scientists.”

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HBO makes some top shows, movies and documentaries free to stream on HBO NOW and HBO GO

Giving people even more of a reason to stay home and follow the social distancing measures designed to stop the spread of COVID-19 in the U.S., HBO said it would be making 500 hours of programming free to stream over HBO NOW and HBO GO without a subscription, starting Friday, April 3.

Shows that audiences can stream include some of the best television shows ever made, like “The Sopranos” and “The Wire,” and other very good HBO shows like “Veep” and “Six Feet Under.”

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No-Sew Pleated Face Mask with Handkerchief and Hair Tie 

As the demand for face masks has been going through the roof in Japan, DIY face masks are trending on social media with instagrammers and vloggers sharing ideas on how to make alternatives to surgical masks. 

After we introduced a template and tutorial on how to sew a face mask last week, the article has received a huge traffic with comments asking for advice. Most of our regulars were seasoned crafters to whom a little sewing project would be a breeze, but we came to realize that at times like these, we can help more people by sharing tutorials that anyone can easily take advantage of.

This week, we are sharing the simplest, easiest and useful mask tutorial. No cutting or sewing is required. (Yes, it’s true!)

This mask is not meant to replace surgical face masks, but when you must go out, something to cover yourself is better than nothing, and at the very least, it will remind you to not touch your face.

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Have a 3D Printer? You Can Use It to Make Face Shields for Medical Workers

 

When a call went out to researchers at Michigan State University to search their labs for medical supplies such as face masks and donate them to medical workers battling COVID-19, assistant professor Nathan Tykocki and his colleagues started talking about how else they could help. They had 3D printers on hand. How could they put them to use?

As many other researchers and home hobbyists have discovered, the most promising answer turned out to be face shields. Simple in design, face shields can be produced and assembled by hobbyists on home 3D printers. If you are searching for a way to help medical workers and already have a 3D printer (or even a laser cutter) at home, you might be able to join an organized effort near you.

What is a face shield, and what does it do?

When a call went out to researchers at Michigan State University to search their labs for medical supplies such as face masks and donate them to medical workers battling COVID-19, assistant professor Nathan Tykocki and his colleagues started talking about how else they could help. They had 3D printers on hand. How could they put them to use?

As many other researchers and home hobbyists have discovered, the most promising answer turned out to be face shields. Simple in design, face shields can be produced and assembled by hobbyists on home 3D printers. If you are searching for a way to help medical workers and already have a 3D printer (or even a laser cutter) at home, you might be able to join an organized effort near you.

What is a face shield, and what does it do?

There are many types of face shields, but the type most medical workers are seeking is a piece of clear, curved plastic suspended in front of the wearer’s face by a headband. It helps stop bodily fluids and droplets, whether from a patient’s cough or a medical event such as a birth, from reaching the wearer’s eyes, nose, or mouth. A shield is usually meant to provide secondary protection when used with a primary piece of personal protective equipment (PPE) such as a face mask.

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10 easy food crops for your Bay Area food garden during coronavirus pandemic

In times of insecurity, we return to the basics, such as being with those we love, cooking with staples or growing food. While a garden takes time to grow, and it won’t fully feed your family, it can definitely increase your sense of calm and provide some help with groceries.

Fortunately, among the fastest crops, and the most useful right now, are leafy greens. They can provide something fresh and clean in a time of limited shopping. While there have been no reports of COVID-19 spread by food, there is peace of mind in cutting fresh greens you grew yourself. A garden is also a fine activity for schoolchildren home during this crisis. They will have fun while learning a garden’s usual lessons of consistent nurturing and patience.

There will be some limitations to gardening during this period of coronavirus concern. Most nonprofit vegetable plant sales have been canceled, and we are hesitant to shop at all, although San Francisco’s shelter-in-place order exempts activities related to food gardening. Many nurseries are open, though they might have shortened hours and could have shortages of particular plants, seeds or other supplies.

Remember that hardware stores, which are also allowed to stay open, carry some garden plants and seeds. To protect their workers, stores might allow only curbside pickup of orders. Mail-order seed and garden-supply companies are mostly operating normally but might be a bit slower to deliver due to higher demand. To learn of current conditions at local or mail-order sources, start with a look at their websites. You might be able to call them, but don’t be surprised if you get a recording because their workers are too overburdened to answer phone calls.

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Le Creuset Put Its Factory-to-Table Sale Online for the First Time Ever—Here’s What to Get

Everything from Dutch ovens to bakeware is discounted

If you’ve been spending more time indoors due to social distancing, you’ve likely considered starting a cooking project or two. From warm, fresh-baked bread to big batches of hearty stews, recipes offer a welcome distraction and yummy sustenance. And here’s an even bigger incentive to upgrade your cooking game: Le Creuset just slashed the prices of its high-quality cookware up to 50 percent off.

While the cult-favorite French brand typically hosts in-person Factory-to-Table sales in cities like Dallas, Charleston, and Charlotte, this year it’s brought the deep discounts online for the first time ever. Everything from Dutch ovens and baking dishes to enameled skillets are up to 50 percent off at lecreuset.com. The flash sale even includes exclusive discounts on limited-edition products, including pieces typically reserved for the Le Creuset vault.

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Newest shortage in New York: The city is running out of dogs to adopt

Of all the shortages created by the coronavirus pandemic—the toilet paper and the hand sanitizer and the bottled water—the oddest of them all has to be dogs. Oh, and cats too.

That’s right, in the New York city area, the epicenter of the disease, there is suddenly a run on pets. At least of the adopted or fostered kind. Muddy Paws Rescue and Best Friends Animal Society are reporting shelters they work with are either all out of or almost out of cats and dogs after a surge in applications of as much as 10-fold in the past two weeks.

Ordered to shelter in place at home, and both a little bored and a lot anxious, New Yorkers apparently see the four-legged friends as way to calm frayed nerves. “For the moment we definitely don’t have any dogs left to match,” said Anna Lai, the marketing director at Muddy Paws. “Which is a great problem to have.”

It also helps explain why shares of Chewy Inc. are soaring right now even as the stock market overall crashes. It’s up 13% this year, as customers hunker down and order online. The spike in volume has pushed delivery times to between seven and 10 days for most customers, according to the company’s website.

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99-year-old West Vancouver man recovers from COVID-19 in retirement home

Reuben Huva made a full recovery after contracting coronavirus at Hollyburn House earlier this month

A 99-year-old West Vancouver man who tested positive for COVID-19 has recovered completely and is back to his “cheerful old self,” his daughter says.

Reuben Huva, who lives in Hollyburn House retirement home, started developing minor symptoms earlier this month, Linda Horspool said.

He was tired, not eating well and had a slight cough, so staff initially thought her father had a cold, she said. On March 11, she got a call saying he’d tested positive for COVID-19. 

“We were probably seeing what was dad’s death sentence,” recalled Horspool, a retired doctor.

“I didn’t really think a 99-year-old in a wheelchair could possibly survive it, to be honest.”

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